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MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2

MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2

One thing that MTC Optics can’t be accused of is resting on its laurels, as its policy of ‘gentle evolution’ sees something new or innovative being released periodically. Their Viper Connect remains perhaps the most radical product to date, with its minimal parallax and unusual configuration.

On show here is one of the latest Copperhead scopes that they now offer, and whilst they aren’t in the same league for drawing a gasp as their stable mates, they are indeed a smart addition to the MTC product portfolio.

Practical & compact

Looks are way down the list of priorities for many when choosing an optic, however, I really like the ‘copper’ livery, as in the front ring and colour-coordinated badging around the main MTC logo, plus the plate on the ocular bell. It all looks the part and helps to define these scopes as something a bit different.

A big selling point for the Copperhead is the ultra-compactness, and with a chunky 30mm body tube and those target turrets, there’s a stubby look to the profile. It weighs around 1.5 lbs and at 10.8” in length, it really does tick that ‘fairly light and compact’ box. Flip-up lens covers are actually included, but for the purposes of showing off the Copper details, they have been left to one side here.

This is a scope for specific duties then, where an oversized model would be just awkward. Bullpups are a classic example, where appropriately configured sighting systems can just make life easier, and this Copperhead can certainly play a part there. The matte black finish is wholly practical in a hunting environment, and with that raised grip pattern on the turrets and the rear magnification collar, getting a solid handle on things in less-than-ideal conditions should be a given.

Consideration

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One thing to consider though is that all that compactness does mean there’s less length of body tube on either side of the turret saddle to play with. I’m thinking in terms of where to place the scope mounts, and whilst you may find it’s not an issue, sometimes the configuration of a slightly more offbeat gun can be such that the dimensions of a limited scope rail dictate where the mounts are going to sit. If you are tight for space when mounting up, then the solution is of course one of the many ‘reach forward (or back) mounts that are currently available. So, it’s not a problem as such, just as I say, something to consider.

Set-up

Zeroing is very straightforward, and whilst I’m not a fan of these overly bulbous target turrets, there’s no doubt that they are very clearly marked up with an easily readable scale. They are also of the push down to lock, pull up to open variety. Click values represent 1cm at 100m and the movement has a reassuring amount of resistance.

The tip of the left-hand turret is the rheostat for the reticle illumination, with six levels of brightness on the control and alternate ‘off’ stages marked. The inner dial deals with parallax correction. This is marked up with a minimum of 10 yards, then 25, 50, 100, 200 and infinity. On test, I found that the turret would dial in even closer than the marked minimum, more like 6 or 7 yards. However, as usual, personal eyesight will play a part, so the figures on the parallax dial should be taken as a guide and a reference point to work from. Again, the movement is smooth and steady in operation. The magnification collar offers variable magnification from 4x up to 16x, so there’s versatility here at the twist of the dial.

New design

New to this model comes the AMD2 reticle, which is designed to offer true values as per the specification, when viewed at 10x magnification. The central floating cross is 1 Mil value across and that means that the half section is a half Mil. Everything else is proportional, and the stadia diagram includes a lower ladder down, allowing for reference/ aim points for a multitude of distances thereafter. Progressive windage dots also feature, so there is plenty of information and guidance, all in the picture so to speak.

It’s a highly practical design, which also has just the right balance of precision and boldness, so as not to be too easily lost when viewed with a dark background. And on that score, as mentioned, for those who favour the illuminated reticle, just switch it on via the six-stage rheostat dial and the floating central cross will light up in red. Powered by the usual disc-style battery, access to this area is via the now-familiar screw cap on the tip of the left turret.

Clarity from the multi-coated lens system is sharp and image definition, vibrancy and brightness are all very impressive. So, a big thumbs up where it matters!

Assurance

Yes, I would recommend this Copperhead optic, and as you would expect, these scopes come specified as fog proof, shockproof, waterproof and nitrogen purged. They are a neat solution for when an ultra-compact scope is required and a smart addition to the ever-expanding MTC stable.

  • MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2 - image {image:count}

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  • MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

gun
features

  • Name: MTC Copperhead 4-16x44 F2
  • Reticle: AMD2
  • Weight: 24.6oz
  • Eye Relief: 3.6”
  • Click Values: 1cm @ 100m
  • Field of View: 7.9m-1.9 @100yds
  • Body Tube: 30mm
  • Minimum Focus: 10 yards
  • Length: 10.8"
  • Clicks per Rotation: 60
  • Number of Rotations: 4 (Elevation & Windage)
  • Price: £328
  • Contact: MTC Optics - www.mtcoptics.com
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