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Revo Premier Game .410

Revo Premier Game .410

Having already tried and liked the 12 bore Revo Premier Game, Mark Stone now turns his attention to the .410 version

The .410 is by any shotgunning standard something of an anomaly. To start with it’s the only smoothbore that’s a calibre not a gauge or a bore. Also, whereas the .410 is extremely popular in the USA, here in the UK it still suffers from being regarded as ‘just’ the shotgun most people start off with. Before you ask, I started with an old side-by-side 12 bore.

Wider appeal

That said given the fact there’s now a major .410 clay competition backed by Eley along with some significant forward strides in ammunition once again by Eley. Given the increased potency and the fact that the face of game shooting in England is changing, the .410 is now finding a wider audience as conventions - and to a degree traditions – are changing.

Basically the cost of driven game shooting now draws a diminishing audience, many now seeking out other sporting avenues hence the new found interest in the .410. Reason being that although .410 cartridges can seem expensive in comparison to 12 bores, the lower purchase price of the guns combined with more crow, pigeon and squirrel shooting are increasing the .410 appeal. Equally, to be a good shot with a .410 has a beneficial effect on your shotgun shooting as a whole.

Similar ethos

Imported into the UK by Sportsmans Gun Centre the ethos of the Turkish built Revo .410 Premier Game is the exact same as the 12 bore equivalent; namely a good, decent shotgun that offers genuine value for money. At just £424.99 this Revo is exactly that, and this price even includes a plastic travelling case. Apart from the case though all you get is the shotgun, the fact is its fixed Full and ¾ chokes means there aren’t any accessories needed.

What you do get is a sub-gauge shotgun that looks good and handles like a wizard’s wand. The well grained stock has well defined panels of chequering whilst the soft rubber butt plate comes complete with a solid insert inlayed into the heel to ensure drag and snag free mounting. The forend has an Anson style latch.

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Where this Revo comes visually alive is in the dense rose and scroll engraving that covers every piece of available silvered action surface, two raised panels increasing the effect, just the matte stippled fences escaping the attention of the engraving process.

Beneath the mechanical boxlock action that’s based on a time proven design, a short but broad chromed non-adjustable trigger-blade is housed in a black guard, the dark hue continuing with the stubby, short-throw top-lever and barrel selector auto-safety catch. What do impress are the semi matte finished barrels and their quality of striking. Complete with vented mid and 7mm top ribs, a small silver bead sits just to the rear of the muzzles whilst the tubes themselves swage into 3” chambered monobloc chambers, the true heart of this enthusiastic little hunting weapon, the sum of the parts coming together in a .410 shotgun that literally screams to be used. Do please remember though that you only get extractors and not ejectors, so you’ll have to remove the spent cases yourself. 

Corvid collector

With a seemingly endless quantity of crows on my friend’s estate waiting to be dealt with, the prospects of a couple of evenings out and about thinning them down seemed like perfect outings for this .410. Ten minutes before the off a few initial investigations using the Arrow Laser Shot soon highlighted the fact that this Revo shot slightly high, a trait that seems to be a commonality amongst over-under .410s and something that’s more often than not built into most game guns.

The overall weight is just 5lbs 6oz whilst the total length was 47 3/8” mainly due to the optional 30” barrels; 28” tubes are available if you prefer. Drops at comb and heel are 1 5/16” and 2 ¼” with a length and weight of pull that measure 14 ¾” and 5lbs 8oz once you’ve taken up the 1/16” of trigger creep. In other words the Revo .410 should suit both fully grown shooters and juniors alike given such sensible dimensions. Where this little Revo does work well is in the 3” chamber department, the size allowing for the use of decent magnum or heavier loads such as Eley’s .410 Trap. Although by designation these little cartridges are actually a competition load and more than capable of shattering a clay at forty yards, the charge of 7 ½ shot easily transforms into a crow or squirrel basher.

Heading into their roosting quarters it wasn’t long before the Revo started to rack up a decent tally whilst the slender grip and forend meant the quick handling of the gun was such that unexpectedly approaching birds were soon dealt with.  The dimensions and balance point (just forward of the hinges) keeps the .410 light, lithe and active between the hands, the whole gun able to be kept in a state of fluidity, while the tight chokes keep the column of lead tight delivering a good charge of shot where needed.

Piling up the crows along with a few fatally surprised tree rats, the Revo quickly proved its worth, although if I had a criticism it’s that I’d much prefer a manual safety. Your average game shooter likes an auto safe but as someone who shoots a whole assortment of weaponry under a variety of conditions, I find auto safeties a bind and if I close a shotgun its means the shot’s on, if not it remains open which does away with the auto safety regime.
Looks familiar

Before you comment that the Revo Premier Game .410 looks remarkably like another Turkish built sub-gauge, it is. Where the Revo branded version differs is that the levels of decoration are far higher and most surprisingly of all, as a Revo the gun costs £75 less, irrespective of the barrel length you go for.

No matter how you evaluate the Revo .410 I defy anyone to find fault especially on a shotgun that’s as versatile in use and enjoyable to shoot at a price that really defies belief. An excellent little shotgun for a variety of purposes that if only to convince yourself of what you’ve been missing and to confirm that the humble .410 is actually a genuinely effective shotgun. You won’t go far wrong with this little Revo and once again physical testimony as to why the Turkish built shotguns are becoming as popular as they are. GM

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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  • Revo Premier Game .410 - image {image:count}

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