Icon Logo Gun Mart

Mossberg 940 JM Pro

Mossberg 940 JM Pro

Practical Shotgun (PSG), started off as likeminded people just having fun, and proved highly popular. This was in the 1980s when a bunch of us got together at Park Farm in Colchester to shoot the first match organised by a guy called Pete Elliot. It consisted of a series of stages using steel plate targets set in several scenarios. For example, you had the jungle run with up to 50 targets placed on a rundown through the forest. Alternatively a house clearance, or timed speed events with compulsory positions, each requiring different skills. The best quote of the day was ‘it’s the most fun you can have with your clothes on’ and I heartily concur!

Hi-cap preferred

Courses of fire (COFs) were easy to construct due to the limited range of the ammunition. Typically, you needed a hi-capacity gun, with the pump-action being favourite and usually an offthe- shelf Mossberg 500 ATP Slugster or tricked up Remington 870. The former proved the most popular as it came with an 8+1 magazine and iron sights at a great price. The Remy, perhaps the better gun, was both more expensive and only came as a sporter with a 4+1 magazine and fancy timber, so needed a mag extension tube at least. Semi-autos were rare, but things were about to change. Also, there was no capacity limit back then, as providing the gun had a 24” barrel it was a Section 2 shotgun.

Mossberg does it again

As Mossberg’s 500 ATP was ‘the pump to have’ back then, they have not lost sight of how to make a suitable practical shotgun for today’s crowd. Such a design was the 930 JM PRO series semi-auto. JM stands for Jerry Miculek, a top US competition shooter in 3-gun and similar events. Sponsored by Mossberg, he had a lot of input into the build of this model. The trick is that it came from the box ready to rock: 9+1 magazine, extended cocking handle and their signature, tang-mounted safety.

story continues below...

I tested the 930 PRO Series back in 2015 and found it to be a good gun. However, research shows it has been discontinued, to be replaced by the 940 JM PRO, which on the surface looks to be remarkably similar. I did notice a considerable price hike from £775 to £1124 in 2020. Miculek again had a lot of input, so let’s see what the difference is?

Goldy looking chain

Unsurprisingly, the basic build remains the same: alloy receiver, 24” barrel, tang safety, cocked action indicator, trigger stop, extended cocking handle and a set of multi-chokes. The 940 however, shows updates and changes. The set of three chokes: Cylinder - C, Improved Cylinder - IC and Modified - M are from Briley and can be hand fitted. The mag tube gets a screw-off end cap that aids inserting the spring, the magazine follower is anodised orange for improved visibility. The cocking handle has been further extended/ enlarged and the bolt release gets a big thumb plate. These two, the safety, magazine collar, trigger and cocked action indicator are now finished in a gold colour. The receiver is Panzer Grey anodised with the rest of the gun in flat black. The top of the action is drilled and tapped for a scope mount, which is good, but they did not have this extension and I much preferred it. Saying that, in most cases on a COF if you run dry with a semi, the action locks open and it’s probably easier dropping another round in the ejection port and shutting the bolt with the button, so I suppose it makes sense!

Load up

The magazine takes 9-rounds of 2.75” shells plus one up the spout, which is a good capacity. Another anomaly is that you have to ‘time’ the mag tube length as if it’s screwed too far out the fifth shell going in causes the rim of the first to drop into the gap between tube and forend and get stuck. This was easily solved by screwing it in as far as it will go, but something to be aware of.

Practising twin and quad shell loading was interesting and when done right it speeds up loading drills on stage. I have done a video for Gunmart TV and it shows the process to its full advantage. In essence, you need a special shell holder that presents the rounds vertically, in two rows. This allows you to grab two or four and position them nose to base, one line above the other. The gun is inverted so the port is up, and you push in two, then the second pair and as I said, when done right it’s damn fast.

End game

Overall, this is a nice PSGtype gun and one that I reckon is better than a Remy 1100 or 11-87 as it comes from the box ready to rock & roll. Most of the things I don’t like are easily fixable but points off for Mossberg not including sling points, a barrel/mag band and scope base in the package. Cosmetically, the gold-like coating on the trigger, cocking handle, bolt release button and magazine coupler looks really naff. It gets dirty too quickly and is not to my taste. If it were my choice I’d pick the second option the #85113, which is all black with camo furniture and much more subdued.

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Mossberg 940 JM Pro - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

gun
features

  • Name: Mossberg 940 JM PRO #85111
  • Type: Semi-Auto shotgun
  • Capacity: 9+1
  • Barrel: 24”
  • Chamber: 3”
  • Length: 46”
  • Weight: 7.7 lbs
  • Price: £1,124.00
  • Contact: Viking Arms Ltd vikingarms.com/sporting/

0 Comments



Arrow