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Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K

This month Mark Camoccio tests two great fixed barrel, underlever cocking spring rifles – the Air Arms TX200 v the Weihrauch HW97K

When Weihrauch introduced their now legendary HW77 model around 1985, they took the Field Target market by storm. Prior to this landmark event, the top competitors had ‘made do’ with the best of the quality break-barrel designs at the time – Feinwerkbau’s Sport 124; the Weihrauch HW80, Anschütz 335 and the massively proportioned Original 45. All great guns in their day, and all capable of superb accuracy out to FT ranges. Yet all shared that one potential drawback in the design – the break-barrel system itself.

My own Airmasters modified FWB was a fantastic gun, accounting for a significant haul of silverware over the years – but even this fine example of engineering excellence finally succumbed to its basic inherent weakness after extensive use, driving me to distraction in the process, as tiny shifts in zero crept into the equation.
A succession of scopes were blamed, until the problem was correctly diagnosed – the barrel was no longer locking up to an identical point within the breech. With today’s fine tolerances, the problem is largely eradicated, yet piece of mind is the name of the game for any budding competitor.

Enter the HW77 – literally a Godsend to us FT aficionados. A fixed barrel and repeatable consistent accuracy topped the brief, and didn’t we just love it! Custom tuning houses loved it too, with Airmasters and Venom modified versions fighting it out all over the country.

Weihrauch ruled the roost and pretty well had it their own way for some time, but Air Arms - a home based company down in leafy Sussex - was planning a fight-back with their TX200. Better late than never, and with master airgun technician and designer, Ken Turner, roped in on the project, it had success written all over it. The Air Arms’ TX200 quickly established itself as a match for Weihrauch, admittedly following largely in their footsteps, yet pushing the concept to its limits, and building in added refinement along the way.

The test guns

What we have here are the very latest incarnations of the theme from both companies in a head to head test; from Weihrauch, the HW97k and from Air Arms, the TX200.

The HW77 itself is still available, yet the HW97k takes the system further, coming ready fixed with a better defined cheek-piece among other features, along with an integral silencer. Since most customizing outfits were fitting dedicated integral silencer/barrel catch arrangements to the original HW77 as part of the overall upgrade, it was only natural that Weihrauch felt that they may as well get a piece of the action and fit their own factory produced extras from the start. The HW97k embodies this ethos, offering the discerning shooter the highly successful main action from the HW77, with a shortened barrel capped off with an integral silencer.
For the uninitiated, let’s take a brief look at the basic system itself. That parallel bar running underneath the barrel is actually the under-lever, hinged at the breech and retained at the muzzle via a spring-loaded catch.

The cocking cycle is as follows: the under-lever is unclipped by pressing the button - cleverly masked as a dummy barrel tip on the 97k. The lever is then drawn down and pulled right back until the trigger sear engages and the rifle is effectively cocked. Drawing the lever down pulls back the sliding breech at the same time, exposing the loading chamber and giving direct access to the barrel. An automatic safety catch is fitted and falls perfectly under the thumb for easy release when ready to take the shot.

The TX200, given that it took its inspiration from it’s German rival, follows an unsurprisingly similar pattern. With the TX however, the under-lever is purely retained by a spring loaded ball détente at the muzzle. Whilst this is slightly less fiddly to unclip from shot to shot, it should be noted that in the absence of a positive retaining clip, the fitting of sling swivels could prove problematic; with the lever possibly wanting to unclip under the strain. Fitting the front swivel as near to the breech as possible may just suffice, but it is something to bear in mind.

The crisp little safety catch button is in the same place as the Weihrauch, falling to the thumb at the end of the main compression cylinder. Safety is an essential feature on both these rifles due to the loading method (your fingers will at some point be in the loading port) and is more visually evident on the Air Arms with the provision of the ‘Safe-Lok’ system. If you look closely, the exterior of the steel sliding breech displays tiny ratchet notches. These engage with a tooth on the side safety bar at various stages of the cocking stroke; effectively holding back the piston. When you consider the significant poundage just waiting to fly back under spring pressure, you really don’t want any digits to be at risk whilst fiddling in the loading port - so any additional safety aid is a bonus in my book. Weihrauch also include an ‘anti-bear trap’ integral safety system, meaning that the rifle cannot be de-cocked without actually firing off the shot.

Trigger systems

Triggers are always of interest to me on quality rifles, and it’s recognized as a much more demanding task to produce a refined unit with a light pull on a spring-piston rifle, when compared to a pneumatic. The sheer poundage that a trigger unit has to overcome on a recoiling gun can be considerable, whereas there’s really no excuse for a poor unit on any pneumatic design; unless production cost restraints are an issue.

Since both the TX200 and the HW97k are pretty well market leaders in their sector, it would be a surprise if they had anything other than reliable units in place. The HW97k carries on Weihrauch’s proud tradition and sports the grand old ‘Rekord’ trigger, with the only difference being that the blade itself is treated to a gold anodised finish -  and jolly smart it is too! The ‘Rekord’ unit has always been regarded as something of an industry standard; and whilst not a true match set-up, it’s about as good as sporting triggers get. The genuine two-stage mechanism gives plenty of adjustment, and when set correctly, it takes some beating.

The TX200 utilizes the Air Arms ‘CD’ (computer designed) trigger unit, which is every bit as good as the ‘Rekord’- crisp, fairly light and clean breaking.

Both rifles carry top quality barrels – Weihrauch use there own, and Air Arms use a Lothar Walthar; so accuracy is assured as far as the tubes are concerned.

So we’ve established that these two heavyweights have the solid mechanics in place to do the job. So what about the woodwork?

Stock options

The HW97k, despite having it’s roots firmly tied in with the ‘77, really does have a character all of its own. The stock is a vast improvement, even managing to make the HW77’s timber look a little vague.  Since Weihrauch took the bold decision to market the 97k with no open sights whatsoever, it allowed them to be positive with the stock design, with the result that the cheek-piece is far higher and more prominent than on previous models; offering perfect alignment for the scope. Indeed the timber on show for this test rifle is the very latest, incorporating fabulous, swirling panels of cut chequering, in a distinctive pattern; all rather similar to Weihrauch’s Bavarian version of their HW100 PCP model.

Air Arms offer a slightly more curvaceous package, with their latest TX derivative dressed to kill in the very latest HD (High Definition) woodwork. This stock woodwork underwent a serious face-lift towards the tail-end of 2006, and the results are stunning to say the least. Unlike Weihrauch, Air Arms supply the TX in either standard or custom grade. Ironically, the beech stocked version has been so striking in some examples that I’ve seen, that it looks like a fully blown custom stock in its own right.

The key feature of the new stocks is the ‘fish-scale’ HD chequering – an eye-catching design with greater relief in the surface, providing superior grip and real style. The chequering creates some interesting colour contrasts depending upon the wood used.
With the fore-end treated to a subtle curve on the underside, a nicely rounded tip, and a refined grip, capped off with rosewood – these stocks have taken the TX range to new heights.

Range time

Two classy guns indeed; so let’s see how the mechanics fair under closer inspection. Both rifles are in .177 calibre and I’ve tested them with JSB Exact pellets and also a sample of the new Weihrauch FT Special dome–headed pellets (made by H&N), kindly provided by Hull Cartridge along with the 97k. These latter pellets consistently weighed around 8.8grains.

First up was the 97k, and energy was unusually low for this model at 10.1ft/lbs with Weihrauch pellets (10.5ft/lbs with JSB), but the variation was reasonable at 23fps over ten shots. This is not unusual as power will increase as the new gun is ‘run in’. The TX came in spot on power wise straight from the box, with 11.3ft/lbs (Weihrauch pellets), and 11.6ft/lbs (JSB pellets).

On the range the Weihrauch felt solid and well engineered – every inch a thoroughbred. The actual firing cycle was crisp and more of a refined snap with no spring twang whatsoever. Accuracy followed, and a ragged cluster measuring just less than half an inch at 35yds reminded me why the ‘77 had been so dominant back in the ‘80’s.

The TX didn’t disappoint either, and with nylon bearings causing the piston to glide, a refined, tuned feel is what we have come to expect. It didn’t like the German pellets though, and they seemed much tighter in the TX barrel, but over the same 35yds, a competent group of just over half inch was soon on show with JSB pellets. It should be noted that the TX is slightly easier to cock, given that slightly longer cocking stroke, although both guns are perfectly manageable.

Conclusions

What we have here are simply two of my very favourite spring-powered airguns; perfect examples of two manufacturers at the top of their game. The only possible drawback with either is the weight, making them strictly adults only.

Both guns represent something of an investment – in quality engineering and great performance, lending themselves to further customisation/specialist tuning further down the line.

Making a final choice is the tricky part, but one things for sure – they’re a class act and capable of taking on any challenge, whether hunting, HFT or even recoil class Field Target.

Technical Specifications
Model HW97k | TX200
Manufacturer Weihrauch | Air Arms
Country of origin Germany | UK
Type Under-lever, spring power | Under-lever ,spring
Weight 9.25 lbs | 9.25lbs
Barrel length 12 inch | 15.5 inch
Overall length 40.25 inch | 41.5 inch
Calibre .177 on test (.22,.20,.25 avail) | .177 on test (.22 avail)
Stock type Sporter style beech | Sporter style beech
Velocity (in fps, Weihrauch pellets and JSB) (Weih) high 729/(JSB) high 757 | (Weih) high 765/(JSB) high 796
low 706/low 738 | low 753/low 778
average 720/average 750 | average 762/average 786
variation 23/variation 19 | variation 12/variation 18
Energy 10.1ftlbs/10.5ftlbs | 11.3ftlbs/11.6ftlbs
Price £320 | £306 rifle or HC (hunter carbine)
## | £349 walnut version

All Prices Are Guides Due to the Changes in US & European Exchange Rates

Gun Mart Shooters Forum - Get Involved in the Discussion!
User Comments
  • I think the review is pretty accurate and honest. I own a 77 and 97k and they re both fantastic. I have used TX200 and the shooting results are equal to those of the Weihrauchs. The only draw back of the TX is the ratchet sound of the safety catch when the under lever is cocked.

    Comment by: Matt Downes     Posted on: 11 Apr 2009 at 12:07 AM

  • You can disengage the TX's SAF-LOK ratchet by holding in the lever (mounted on the right hand side of the stock, just behind the breech) whilst cocking the rifle. This will stop the noise, but it also disables the safety mechanism - so make sure not to let go of the cocking handle at any point during the cocking procedure (this is good practice anyway).

    Comment by: pat farey     Posted on: 11 Apr 2009 at 02:33 PM

  • The debate on which is the better rifle of the two is ongoing, and general opinion here in South Africa is that the TX is better out the box - but PRICEY, but the HW is better value for money, and with a bit of tuning (at added cost) becomes a superb spring rifle, equalling, if not surpassing the TX as an overall package.

    I own a HW97K, and have put my AA510SL out to pasture due to the sheer challenge and sense of achievement I get when I have a good day at an FT competition with it. The addition of a V-Mach kit has certainly made a significant positive difference in the feel of the rifle. A love affair that will continue for many years!

    Comment by: Sean Orsmond     Posted on: 26 Apr 2009 at 09:20 AM

  • The biggest problem with these two guns is, it's SO dam difficult to choose between them!

    I've just recently purchased a HW97K and choosing between the TX200 and the HW97K was EXCEEDINGLY difficult. They are both really good springers.

    For me it came down to already owning a Weihrauch (plain old brand loyalty) and the annoying 'clickety' anti bear trap on the TX200.

    Comment by: _Jon     Posted on: 27 Apr 2009 at 06:21 PM

  • I own a tx200 mk2 which is one of best rifle's i've owned but i got to try my friend's hw97k. which meant a trip to the local gun shop shortly after where i paid for a brand new hw97k. that was about five week's ago and i've already put about 2000 pellet's through it and shot about 20 rabbit's it's a great gun equal to the tx 200 in all areas .The only thing i have against them is i all so have a prosport which is a better balanced rifle and better looking.For the money you cant go wrong with either the tx200 or hw97k

    Comment by: Kevin Jones     Posted on: 05 May 2009 at 03:47 PM

  • Had my HW97K 5 months still dieseling after five shots ( have cleaned barrel) clears after ten shots. shoots fantastic. Fit a sling if going hunting helps with weight

    Comment by: john townsend     Posted on: 24 Jul 2009 at 08:27 AM

  • used a 97k for quite a few years..it now looks very tatty ..but it is still amazingly accurate..love it to bits and would never part with it..it has had a very hard life..and is a brilliant gun..probably has had in excess of 40000 .22's fired and is as hard hitting as the day I first used it..brilliant gun

    Comment by: ian     Posted on: 19 Aug 2009 at 08:59 PM

  • Have owned the 97K for one year,I love ,have fitted a sling which really helps on long walks or standing shots ,just wish if you could re engage the safety if you decide not to shoot .

    This .22 kills rabbits outright at 35 M , can totally recommend it to all who are robust enough to carry smile

    Comment by: John J Hogan     Posted on: 16 Sep 2009 at 06:29 PM

  • Hi all. I started my air rife shooting back in 2000. I brought myself a secondhand cometor 200 then a BSA lighting. Then converted to pcp with an air-arms s200. I,ve had some time away from air guns. Mostly shooting shotguns. Now I,ve come back I want to go back to my roots. Good old spring. getting to grips with the recoil again. But what to get?????
    I shot a 97k at my local club and fell in love. But now having looked into the tx200 i'm torn. Owning an air-arms i know what there build quity is like. Not that i'm putting down weihrauch in any means!! Theres not really anything in the price or performance. So where do i go from here. PLEASE HELP.
    P.S i'll want to use this in HFT. anwsers on a postcard

    Comment by: kai watts     Posted on: 03 Oct 2009 at 08:48 PM

  • Hi Kai

    As Mark Camoccio said in the article, both these rifles are top class and neither will let you down in either hunting of HFT Recoiling Class. There's nothing much between them so the choice is really down to your personal taste.

    Of course if you are prepared to hunt around, you might be able to find a TX200SR (semi-recoilling) version, which literally moves the TX200 into a another class - well worth a look.

    Comment by: Pat Farey     Posted on: 05 Oct 2009 at 11:13 PM

  • Iam returning bck to Air Rifle shooting after a good 15yrs out. I was looking into a pcp(AA s400) but due to funds being tight a springer was the only real option. Alot of pcp is the only real Air Rifle line of thought out there. But I shot/used a .22 break barrel and had no issues with it.

    And now moving on 15 yrs allI have to say is the springers are even better than before. Its become a bit tougher to choose now lol, due to the wide range of good springers but these two keep comming up in reviews and the TX has popped up in all the recoiling class write ups I have read. I think Iam going to have to toss a coin tbh, seeing I cannot settle on either one.

    But I know which ever one I do get its going to be a very good purchase and one which will last, well forever and perform day after day.

    Comment by: Jason     Posted on: 04 Nov 2009 at 09:36 PM

  • HI can u please tell me the power u can expect from the hw97k just on the review it is low for compared to the tx thanks

    Comment by: steven     Posted on: 07 Nov 2009 at 08:47 PM

  • When writing the review Mark Camoccio remarked that the test gun was unusually low at around 10.5ft/lb, but generally speaking you can expect any ew HW97 or TX200 to give around 11ft/lbs at the muzzle. This is because all Airgun Manufacturers and Trade Association (AMTA) members have an agreement to keep air rifle power sensibly below the 12ft/lbs legal limit. Remember that with use a spring gun's power will begin to climb as the action is 'run in', so it can't be too close to 12ft/lbs to start with.

    It's also worth noting that the actual difference between 10.5ft/lbs and 11ft/lbs at the muzzle is marginal - if you do your part by accurately hitting the target and at a sensible range, the pellet will still do its work effectively.

    Comment by: Pat Farey     Posted on: 08 Nov 2009 at 02:43 PM

  • Thanks Pat I think i will go for the HW97kt as my dads L/H and am R/H so need ambi stock

    Comment by: steven     Posted on: 08 Nov 2009 at 11:26 PM

  • after 20 years i have just purchased a second hand hw97k. But in prestige condition only put out around 2000 slugs from new.
    had a shot of this little baby and fell in love, so smooth and quiet and destroys nice for a springer. Frightened to try owt else incase its better because i love this so much

    Comment by: paul     Posted on: 24 Jan 2010 at 08:00 PM

  • Fellow airgun lovers- bear in mind that pal and fellow South African Seam Orsmond won the 2009 FT world champs with a 97K, tuned to around 730fps. There were much fancier machines costing a lot more, but the 97K is an absolute winner.

    Comment by: Nick Bee     Posted on: 26 Jan 2010 at 12:47 PM

  • I`ve owned both a HW77 (yes I know it`s not externally identical to a 97`!,but internally it is!) and a TX200 H.C.,-I now have a 0.22 TX200 Mk2 rifle and it is an incredibly smooth shooter .

    The TX200 I.M.O. is a smoother shooter "straight out of the box" than the HW77/97 ,also because it has very little pre-load on the m/spring,the TX200 is a doddle to work on.The HW under-levers respond better to fitting a tuning kit,but because it`s piston runs on 2 delrin rings ,-the TX200 is already like a tuned gun from the off.Air Arms have taken HW`s design a step further (something not mentioned in this review)

    Safe shooting

    Kenny

    Comment by: kenny burns     Posted on: 12 Mar 2010 at 09:24 PM

  • After firing the hw97k which i still own then comparing it to my new tx200hc the airarms is like they say its the best spring rifle you can buy and can i just say the hw97k is still good fun but the TX200HC EATS IT ALIVE.

    Comment by: rob     Posted on: 30 Mar 2010 at 12:00 AM

  • ive owned both, plus had the tx200hc in .177 & .22.. my 97k was .177
    build quality wise there both as good as each other! the rekord trigger on the 97k is very nice even though i have always prefered the cd on the AA.

    both will out shoot the owner, if i had the choice and only had enough cash for one of them, id buy the tx200hc

    if i had abit more cash id buy a theoben evo k in .20 instead

    Comment by: chief wiggum     Posted on: 20 Apr 2010 at 03:47 AM

  • if you love your airguns and hunting with them check these vids out

    http://www.youtube.com/user/customtuned

    Comment by: customtuned     Posted on: 20 Apr 2010 at 03:51 AM

  • Can some one help.
    I have a HW77 and the under lever for cocking will not stay up. i bought the rifle like this.
    What is supposed to hold the lever up when cocked.
    Many thanks
    George Bell

    Comment by: george bell     Posted on: 19 May 2010 at 03:00 PM

  • There should be a sprung ball catch beneath the barrel (directly under the front sight assembly) which locates in an indentation at the end of the cocking lever.

    One or other of these components (ball catch or cocking lever end assembly)) must be broken or missing.

    An exploded diagram of the HW77 and spare parts are available in the UK from TW Chambers, website www.gunspares.co.uk

    Comment by: Pat Farey     Posted on: 20 May 2010 at 01:26 AM

  • ive had hw77 and hw 97,,both brill guns,,but ive had tx 200 hc now for about a month,and with over 200 acres of woods and valleys to shoot,it has not missed a beat,,had some long shots out to 60 meters,,yes i know this a long shot for any air rifle,but must say this rifle is so good at what it does,ideal for adults ,to heavey for kids,very accurate,very powerful,would recommend one piece mount as they can slip due to power,iam now shooting rabbits at 55 yrds with no problems clean kills,i would not undertake this if i was useing anyother guns,,,brill,,,

    Comment by: andy forster     Posted on: 24 May 2010 at 12:40 PM

  • That rachet sound is easily gotten rid of by holding down the release catch during cocking/return the whole movement then becomes silent 110%. The TX200 MKIII easily surpasses anything Weihrauch can muster...even the HW97KT cannot match.

    Comment by: Aaron     Posted on: 18 Sep 2010 at 05:48 PM

  • i had a bsa polaris which totaly disappointed me..i took it back 2 the shop n exchanged it for a hw97k..its been 1 year now im totaly satisfied with my 97k...its really amazing in accuracy...ive always had a good bag with it ..i totaly recommend hw97k for anyone who is looking for value for money spring gun

    Comment by: max     Posted on: 26 Nov 2010 at 11:29 PM

  • I owned a TX200 for 5 years, I have to say JUST USE IT!, They get better and better with age, the trigger is superb and in my opinion much better than the Rekord unit fitted to 97k. just keep it well maintained and it will never let you down. If I had to moan it would be about the Barrel fixing, mine came loose twice. Apart from that - perfect.

    Comment by: mick middleton     Posted on: 23 Jan 2011 at 11:32 AM

  • Hi I have owned both guns, they are both superb> I had to by a thumbhole stock modle after a nasty bike smash left me with little rotation to the right wrist so chose a new 97k thumbhole stock modle, what id like to know and this sounds silly possibly but will a silencer fit onto the already fitted silencer... hope that makes sence,,, as its very "cracky" on discharge i bought one official it has a washer and is threaded at best guss it looks like the old end piece on the rifle screws off with an alen key as both the silencer and new one have Hex ends??? is this correct can anyone tell me? Much regards,,, Its been 7 years after my bike smash and this is the 1st oppertuaty ive had to return to shooting after such... ive been shooting since 4years old and in the army its been a long 7 years waiting to be fit enough agen to enjoy our sport..... Phil

    Comment by: phil adams     Posted on: 07 Mar 2011 at 04:51 PM

  • The author replies;
    On the HW97, there is a small disc underneath foresight. This needs to be removed, them silencer can be removed. Hull Cartridge can then supply a replacement, more significant silencer. Call Kevin at Hull Cartridge on Tel 01482 342571

    Comment by: Pat Farey     Posted on: 08 Mar 2011 at 05:09 PM

  • Ive owned a tx200 for 2 years now and i love it to bits. Its a cracking air rifle and i was torn between the tx200 and the hw 97, but when i held both in the air gun shop i liked the tx200 more. It has a better shoulder pad for one thing and its stock is beautiful. Its lovely to shoot too, ive not missed much with it and when i have its all down to me not the gun. Having that said i still wanted a HW , so got my self the new HW97kt synthetic last week. My first air rifle was a HW35e and i had fond memories of plinkin with it. So i knew HW97k was going to be a good gun and it is.I picked the synthetic stock so it wouldnt be a temptation away from my TX200.I think if you are going to chose one its going to be difficult, but i would still pick the TX200 . Buy British.

    Comment by: Gary McMaster     Posted on: 05 Apr 2011 at 07:34 PM

  • I bought a HW97KT a few weeks ago - after debating which to go for between the TX200 and the 97. My son-in-law already has a TX200. Being a lefty I opted to go for the Thumbhole 97. We often shoot side by side and there's nothing to choose between them performance-wise, and they weigh about the same. But, I find the HW97KT so comfortable to shoot with, especially as it's got the adjustable shoulder pad (and so does my son-in-law!). The only things that went in favour of the TX was it's slightly easier to cock, and the silencer seems more efficient. Personally I'm happy with the trade-off - I'd sooner have the comfort! Just love the way it tucks into my shoulder and my hand wraps into the grip. Engineering-wise and for overall quality I don't think there's anything to seperate them. Both are excellent guns IMO.

    Comment by: Ken Wright     Posted on: 16 Jun 2011 at 06:37 PM

  • Hi all,
    I have a Diana 27 and a hw97k but the Diana is outshooting the 97
    I am about to replace the Breach seal but my other problem is the cocking lever on the 97 does not lock properly - like something extra is in the chamber stopping it from closing fully.
    Now after removing what I assume was a pellet that has been flattened in the forward part of the chamber - the cocking lever still does not naturally lock into place.
    This rifle (not mine) has not been looked after properly but it is a lovely rifle to hold and deserves better.
    I am in the south of france so too difficult to send to uk to be looked at and as it's not mine.. I wondered if the was something I could do.
    Note I have removed the stock and all looks good. I can only think that the led I removed from the chamber has bent something over a period of time.
    Many thanks for kind advice
    Great review btw - the Diana is my sons (was my first rifle) but after holding the 97... My youth is flooding back..

    Comment by: Markv     Posted on: 10 Aug 2011 at 07:16 PM

  • Bought a HW97KT a few weeks back after looking at both the 97 and the TX200 for quite a while, finally made a decision, and am very happy with my choice and love shooting the Weihrauch. Then just after buying, a friend of the family gave me a rifle that was bought a while back and never gets used, and to my surprise, its a TX200! Pretty much comes down to personal preference, I prefer the feel of the 97, but they're very close!

    Comment by: Luke     Posted on: 13 Aug 2011 at 03:48 PM

  • hi
    have both tx200 mk3 full length and just got hw97kt mk2 both are excellent guns

    however couple of niggles with tx200 cocking leaver pivot pin on mine moved out of place and caused the breech not to lock properly, wrecking the breech seals.
    The AA replacement seals when tested are not big enough have to pack them with 1 strip of gas fitters ptfe tape 0.2mm thick behind the 2 orings to get proper seal and thread lock the pivot pin in place. problems solved
    fps went from 15-23fps spread over 10 shots (tested twice) to 7fps spread and no variation in the action sound when fired.
    Hw97 7fps variation out of the box no problems
    daystate 4.53 ft pellets ( no longer available )
    both rifles produce excellent groups
    please note this is not a criticism of air arms i have 3 of there rifles, 2 have however had warranty defects ( just my luck ) all sorted quickly
    i also have 3 HW's and no such problems
    i like both guns so much there is nothing much to pick between them.
    if you are looking for an excellent spring rifle either of these fit the bill
    although TX200's firing cycle seems a little better out of the box to me.

    Comment by: tony68     Posted on: 27 Nov 2011 at 06:21 PM

  • Just come back into the airgun shooting, and found a local second hand shop selling the tx200 which i purchased. Back in the day i used the hw77.
    Having now shot both rifles and using various pellets i have now got the shooting within 1/2 inch groupings. The only thing i dont like about the tx200 and the hw97 is no sights, this might not bother some people but i do like shooting without a scope.

    Still enjoy using the tx200.

    Comment by: Jason     Posted on: 26 Jan 2012 at 07:08 PM

  • I have had my 97k for 12 years and it still performs perfectly.
    From new it was slightly underpowered and I bought a Webley Venom tuning kit .Although my rifle is .22 I was advised to fit a .177 tuning kit. what a massive power gain. Be careful as my friend had a BSA rifle and tuned it the same, the stock split.

    Comment by: Nick     Posted on: 18 Feb 2012 at 11:32 PM

  • I bought a HW97KT (thumbhole stock) and love it! It still standard (17,5J) and did show some slowburn at the first 50 or so shots (smoke). But it is a dream to shoot. I have owned many airrifles including a Hw80 but this is something else. You just know this gun can do it and that the rest is up to you.
    I had the pleasure of shooting a V-mach tuned (16J/ 12 ftlbs) hw97k and that just made it even better! So very smooth! So i will soon tune my gun to a Vmach 16j version.

    This gun i will never ever let go <3

    Comment by: Eric     Posted on: 23 Apr 2012 at 09:16 PM

  • Il still go.for the 97.for the overall build quality..not the air armsSouth moean build...the piston shortening of the 97.gives a huge power increase than the air arms..the cocking lever moves bach almost to the trigger guard...and maintains the solid accuracy........97k..Vs air arms pleeeaase.

    Comment by: skoper-uk     Posted on: 20 May 2012 at 12:58 AM

  • I have owned a HW97K now for around 10 years and have used it very effectively for vermin control, the rifle really is epic, and having owned many air guns and rifles in my youth I would recommend this quality air rifle to anyone. The weight may be an issue to younger shooters, but this will become a family airloom, and I look forward to teaching our daughter to shoot it when she is a little older. I read in an earlier e mail a shooter was disappointed that the safety could not be reset once taken off? On my rifle I can go as if to load it again by pulling the cocking arm down again whilst still loaded, and this puts the safety pin in the safe position without discharging the gun.
    Hope this helps.
    Best regards - David.

    Comment by: David Ledger     Posted on: 13 Jul 2012 at 05:06 PM

  • Both these rifles are fantastic and I'd be hard pressed to pick a favourite.

    Your tip regarding the safety catch should help a lot of shooters.

    Comment by: Troll Hunter     Posted on: 13 Jul 2012 at 06:09 PM

  • 0825881017 >>> where can i hunt in western cape region with my Air Arms 510S .22??? regards Paul

    Comment by: paul     Posted on: 13 Sep 2012 at 09:06 PM

  • Sorry Paul but we have no way of answering this question for you!

    Maybe somebody out there can point you in the right direction.

    Comment by: Troll Hunter     Posted on: 13 Sep 2012 at 09:14 PM

  • Hi Paul, GunMart is a UK based magazine, but I take it that you are in South Africa? If so, try contacting the South African Field Target Association at;
    www.saftaa.co.za

    Although they are a target shooting organisation, they probably have members who are hunters that might be able to help with your enquiry.

    You could also try contacting the South African Air Rifle Forum at:
    www.airrifle.co.za

    Good luck

    Comment by: Pat Farey     Posted on: 14 Sep 2012 at 11:35 AM

  • Hi Paul,

    Sorry for the abrupt reply yesterday, bad day at work!

    It's no excuse though, so please accept my apologies and good luck with your search for some hunting land. You've certainly chosen a nice rifle.

    All the best.

    Comment by: Troll Hunter     Posted on: 14 Sep 2012 at 01:39 PM

  • In regards to spring-piston air rifles - there are really only three at the very top of the tree.
    1.Air Arms ProSport
    2.Air Arms TX200 Mk3
    3.Weihrauch HW97K ( or KT )
    Nothing else will touch these guns.
    In the right hands, these springers will scare the life out of a very good PCP Shot, such is their repeatable accuracy.

    It comes down ultimately to a bit of 'brand loyalty' if one was to choose.
    I know, have all three !! great plan !

    Comment by: Haggis     Posted on: 20 Sep 2012 at 07:43 PM

  • hi which one would be better for a leftie?

    Comment by: keith     Posted on: 17 Dec 2012 at 03:03 AM

  • The build quality of the 97 is superb,i think these are a better gun than the air arms ,german quality at its best.

    Comment by: ian     Posted on: 10 Jan 2013 at 08:57 PM

  • Both great guns as stated in the article.

    I think all the HW fans are forgetting the fact that the TX has a better safety mechanism, and most importantly, nylon guides/bushings that the piston rides on VS the 97 having "metal-on-metal". This alone puts the TX miles ahead, dont forget, the TX is a IMPROVED version of the 77/97.

    Don't get me wrong, 77/97's are absolutely excellent guns, but there is a reason people pay $300 to put a V-Glide system in them, that makes it function as a TX 200 does with nylon or delrin guides...

    I own a TX200 HC with 12FPE Vortek kit and a HW97K with V-glide Piston and Compression chamber, both great guns, but the 97 does not compare without the V-Glide system. The TX also has a much more comfortable palm swell on the grip, and the stock is one of the nicest I have seen on any production, ever...

    Comment by: jgoodz     Posted on: 31 Aug 2013 at 10:47 PM

  • Just bought a HW97KT and love it .... The only reason I chose this against the TX200 was because of reduced dexterity in both my hands loading is a problem so found the larger loading port of the Weihrauch much easier to use.

    Comment by: Leonard Smith     Posted on: 09 Oct 2013 at 02:24 PM

  • Heaven help someone having to choose after reading all of these! Obviously both very good, but am surprised no one included the Walther LGU into the mix?
    Me, I've chosen the Weirauch HW97K (was going Walther) and shoot left handed. The KT variant is truly ambidextrous as is the Walther I believe, whereas the K is not truly ambidextrous, but can be shot happily left handed as I do. With the AA you have to order a more expensive walnut stock for left handing.

    Very very happy with my Weihrauch...............Amazing.

    Comment by: Laurence Milton     Posted on: 21 Aug 2014 at 07:22 PM

  • I may be wrong but I don't think the LGU was available when this review was written and a 3 way review might have been a little tricky when they're all such nice air rifles.

    Let us know how you're getting on with your 97 in a few months, I doubt you'll have anything negative though!

    Comment by: Troll Hunter     Posted on: 21 Aug 2014 at 07:59 PM

  • Very true "Troll Hunter".........
    I now have a sling and Vanguard monopod: horse chestnuts at 30yards ( rabbit head or smaller?) are consistently hit. I treat my Weihrauch with the reverence I used to place on my shotgun! A very beautifully made and impressive rifle.
    If some one was having to choose, as I did, it will of course be down to preference when all 3 are seen and handled. I had to rule the AA out completely due to the cost of "left handidness" and smaller loading breech as a consequence, not any capability differentials!
    I am though very, very happy with the Weihrauch.

    Comment by: Laurence Milton     Posted on: 31 Aug 2014 at 05:46 PM

  • Don't want to be a stinkfingers , have owned both TX200 and HW97k. Each are nicely made , the TX200 all weather airgun was better and could shoot straight a 5 shot string of pellets @ 35 yards, out of the box! But complicated to load with its bear trap safety gizmo thingy, could be a right pain.......HW97K needs a running in period ? easy to cock and load, a bit rough, can rust and is very heavy, after a day out in the field.
    What do I need to do, buy a BSA XL instead. Not a problem .

    Comment by: Simo-Whitt     Posted on: 05 Sep 2014 at 12:38 PM

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Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
Air Arms TX200 vs the Weihrauch HW97K
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