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Air Arms TDR S410

Air Arms TDR S410

When ‘take-down’ rifles first appeared on the airgun scene, it’d be true to say they were seen by many as gimmicks or a ‘poacher’s tool’ and by and large weren’t taken seriously. These days more ‘quick strip’ designs are being offered; proving that they’ve been accepted and are now regarded as specialised rifles with a specific role in the big scheme of things.

When I first heard Air Arms had decided to produce a take-down/modular rifle based on their very popular S410 it immediately stirred my interest. Called the TDR (Take Down Rifle) it was originally only available in .22 calibre. So enamoured was I by it that I purchased one with the intention of eventually having it modified to .177 by John Sykes at Hydrographics, as at the time he had seen the potential for doing this modification.

Well, Air Arms have finally released a .177” version after ironing out the niggles the smaller calibre would ‘throw at them’ in this format. The main factor was that the shot count would be miniscule, so the reservoir would have to be longer to accommodate more air and of course the barrel lengthened accordingly. However, most other features remain the same and as some design features on standard S400/410 series have moved on these have been incorporated into the new TDR. These include the upgraded fill point and latest 2-stage trigger with manual safety. But first, let’s take a look at what’s in the bag.

Bag Man

The TDR comes in three separate sections; detachable stock, action/mainframe and silencer, all of which fit into a neat, black carry case courtesy of luggage and accessory specialists, Napier. In my opinion Napier knows what they are about, so well done Air Arms for entrusting the ‘bagging up’ of the rifle to them. Opening the zip flap reveals the egg shell foam lining that offers the rifle maximum protection. Two Velcro fastening straps keep the components in their purpose-shaped compartments. The bag has a carry handle and double shoulder harness so you can back pack it too. There’s also a single shoulder strap. The latter two systems are fully detachable.

Obviously the first job is to assemble the rifle. No hardship here, as the detachable butt section simply pushes into the rear of the action behind the pistol grip where three steel prongs locate into mating holes. It’s secured by pushing in against spring tension, then turning the large, knurled edge fixing screw positioned just forward of the adjustable sliding rubber butt pad.

Finally slip the silencer on and secure it with a finger screw. The rifle now measures 40.5”overall and 6.7lb un-scoped. That’s only two inches longer than the .22 calibre version and a measly 0.2lbs heavier. After assembly, it’s just a matter of fitting a scope as usual and zeroing in, but first a closer look at the stock arrangement.

Feels Good

Made of walnut, and as you’d expect of a take down design, the forend is separate and attached to the action/mainframe whilst the butt is simply an alloy tube with an ‘isolated’ cheek piece and full rubber sliding adjustable butt pad. Despite the butt sections rather marginal looks it does not feel awkward or unpleasant when mounted. The cheek piece is of a reasonable height and thickness that allows for a more than adequate headrest. What certainly helps with sighting and eye/scope alignment is the inclusion of the sliding adjustable butt pad. Under the cheek rest is a large recess with two spring clips that can be used to store spare magazines. A clever idea and one that will doubtless appeal to many hunters, if for nothing else than you know where the spare ammo is stashed even when it’s in the case.

Incidentally don’t go thinking you can use this as a high power pistol as the design will not function unless the butt is properly fitted. The forend has a steep, full wrap around pistol grip design with stippling offering a firm hold for the shooting hand. The design is short but deep in profile though tapers sharply upward to run parallel with the air reservoir. Though quite sparse it’s so designed that it affords a well-crafted chunk of wood for the leading hand to hold.

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Super Safe and Sintered

The forend also has an accessory rail in its underside for fitting a bipod, torch or even a laser. Air Arms also includes an air pressure gauge so you can keep an eye on the fill status too. The rifle is now filled like other new models in the range by the super safe, sintered bronze valve that ensures no dirt or grit enters the air reservoir. The rifle comes supplied with a brass, cap-shaped adaptor that pushes onto the fill point. Once attached to the hose of a divers’ bottle - or a manual pump - simply fill the air reservoir to the usual 190bar. Even in .177” the TDR is very air efficient now having a longer reservoir that will give approximately 60 full power shots. That figure should be noted as I remember the main comments of the original in .22 where that it had too low a shot-count.

No surprises the action scores very highly as the rifle is based on the S410 multi-shot so no problems with the 10-shot removable un-sprung magazine, solid ‘railed’ action block and ergonomic alloy bolt. Pull back the cocking lever, take out the magazine and drop in a pellet into each chamber as you manually index the inner drum around, then slip it back into the action and pushing in the cocking bolt has pellet ‘Numero Uno’ ready to go.

The TDR’s 2-stage trigger is the same up-graded version found on other new S400/500 series rifles. If you ever wondered what the milled slot in the underside of the guard was for, then wonder no more, as it allows access to the three grub screws that adjust the mechanism. These sort the first and second stage pull weights and sear engagement. It also has the manual, in-blade, cross bolt safety which is the norm on any new S400/500 series Air Arms sporter.

Solid as a Rock

For scoping up there’s the same amount of rail on the action block, but again a bit short in front of the magazine but there’s usually no problems dropping any scope on this rifle.
I used a Hawke 3 – 9 X 50 Airmax® with Map 6 Ballistic Reticule and even with a larger optic such as this on board the TDR feels solid on aim and still very light and manoeuvrable.

As for accuracy – do you really need to ask?  Feed the rifle quality ammo and like its fixed formed relative it gives stunning results out to 40 yards with thumbnail size groups easily achieved from a rested position. The 15.75” barrel is a top quality, free-floating, Lothar Walther with an O-ring insert strengthening band and the Pro 76 silencer does a very efficient job of keeping the muzzle report nice and quiet!

In my opinion, the TDR in .177 calibre is now even more of a desirable rifle. Even its original detractors must now see this is a serious hunting tool and it really does deserve to be treated as such. 

Although I personally like these trimmed, modular-type rifles, there is good reason at times to for anyone to have a TDR, as sometimes ‘discretion’ when carrying and transportation to a shooting area is of importance. Due to the neat, non-threatening nature of the dedicated bag it can be carried easily and discreetly without upsetting the public. 

Personally, I could easily find a place in my armoury for this rifle even though I already own a .22 version. In fact, looks like I’m going to have to save my pennies as I’m totally smitten with the new .177” versions as I’m sure others will be.

We Reckon:
In 177 this is a stunner
Discreet carry when needed
Accurate and effective

PRICE:
£599.40p including bag
Spare magazines £28.05p

  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

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  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

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  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

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  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Air Arms TDR S410 - image {image:count}

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gun
features

  • Name: Air Arms TDR S410
  • Type: Bolt action cocking and loading probe PCP
  • Capacity: 10 (DM)
  • Calibre: .177 on test, .22 available
  • Stock: Walnut
  • Sights: N
  • Grooved for scope mounting: Y
  • Barrel: –15.75”

11 Comments

  • Your Daystate MK 3 is a very nice rifle, as you know and so is the TDR, so it's up to you I'm afraid. That's not much help but it all comes down to gun fit really and whether you really need the take down facility.

    Default profile image
    Troll Hunter
    22 Apr 2014 at 12:45 AM
  • thinking of swapping my daystate mk3 for one of these good or bad move

    Default profile image
    william park
    13 Apr 2014 at 06:32 PM
  • I would always recommend .177 - it flies flatter and faster, therefore is more forgiving of range estimation and wind.

    Others prefer .22 for its stopping power, but .177 will kill cleanly with head shots.

    Default profile image
    Pat Farey
    01 Jun 2010 at 01:05 AM
  • Hi Pete,

    I'm thinking of buying this gun and I'm into bushcraft/survival and this gun sounds ideal for weight and manoeuvrability.

    Which would you recommend the .177 or the .22. ?

    Regards

    Andy

    Default profile image
    andrew Jones
    31 May 2010 at 11:46 PM
  • Steven,
    You can also purchase the stud for your TDR from BAR, have a look at their AA accessories page and you'll find it at the bottom.
    They also stock Harris bipods, you have to pay a bit more for the swivel model but it's definitely worth the extra cash.
    All the best,
    Chris

    Default profile image
    Christopher Patterson
    28 Jan 2010 at 01:12 AM
  • Hi Steve,
    The info you need for getting the stud (contact - Hydrographics) is right above your enquiry. As for a Harris Bipod any good gunshop should have them in or will order the model you want from Deben.
    As for pellets, if you're achieving the accuracy you want - why change. Those pellets are fine.
    Cheers
    Pete

    Default profile image
    Pete Wadeson
    05 Dec 2009 at 07:44 PM
  • Just wondering where i can purchase a harris bipod and fixing screw for my tdr cos i'm having grief obtaining said item? Plus what pellets would you recommend? I'm currently using aa ft .177 4.51. Thanks, steve

    Default profile image
    Steven Phythian
    04 Dec 2009 at 10:20 AM
  • I just thought I would leave another wee comment regarding the TDR accessory rail.
    I received my Harris LM swivel bipod and AA TDR accessory rail stud a few days ago and I'm very happy with it.
    The stud just slides along the rail and the bipod clips onto the stud like any other stud, at first the AA stud is very loose but when the screw on the bipod is tightened the stud is held firmly in place with no movement whatsoever.
    Removing the bipod is a very simple affair also and just involves loosening the bipod screw and slipping it off the rail along with the accessory stud.
    It literally takes seconds to take it on and off and really adds to an already excellent rifle.
    I can't wait to ambush some bunnies!
    Kind regards,
    Chris

    Default profile image
    Christopher Patterson
    21 Oct 2009 at 06:28 PM
  • Thanks for taking the time to get back to me Pete, it's much appreciated.
    It does seem a strange situation doesn't it?
    When I contacted AA all they could offer me was a "long leg rifle rest"
    I have noticed that this is listed on some advertisements contained within the shooting magazines but I have never been able to find it on any retailer websites!
    As you suggested Pete they really seem to be missing out on potential aftermarket sales, some kind of simple mount that would allow you to fit a tactical light or laser would be fantastic and probably fairly cheap and easy to produce.
    You could attach the light or laser to the mount and just slide it on and of as required (perhaps with some kind of tightening screw to keep it in place)
    Anyway, thank you for the Hydrographics tip Pete. I'll have a good think regarding a suitable design and take it from there.
    Kind regards,
    Chris

    Default profile image
    Christopher Patterson
    18 Oct 2009 at 09:14 PM
  • Hi Chris,
    Glad u like the rifle - it is prob the best take down. Your enquiry isn't uncommon and even I think AA are missing out on 'after sales' accessories. Why have an accessory rail if you don't supply the accessory attachments? Anyway, your solution is to contact Hydrographics, tell them what you need and they'll make it for the rail.
    Hope that helps
    Cheers
    Pete

    Default profile image
    Pete Wadeson
    18 Oct 2009 at 02:26 PM
  • Nice review as always Pete!
    I picked up a .177 TDR in the summer and I haven't put it down since, I really enjoy using this rifle.
    Just one quick question regarding the review if you don't mind?
    You mentioned that the accessory rail can be used for "fitting a bipod, torch or even a laser"
    I have just purchased a Harris bipod for the rifle (along with the required fixing screw) but I have been unable to find anything suitable that could be mounted to the rail.
    I tried contacting Air Arms and they were a bit vague to be honest!
    I would love to be able to find a suitable mount that would allow me to attach my Ledray GL4 to the accessory rail rather than fit it to the scope.
    Kind regards,
    Chris

    Default profile image
    Christopher Patterson
    17 Oct 2009 at 02:54 AM


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