Icon Logo Gun Mart

Armex XTC Marauder

Armex XTC Marauder

Armex says; “this is AirMagnum Mayhem.” As you can choose the XTC Marauder (on test) or the XT version (the same minus bipod) or keep it basic and go Tactical Synthetic. This takes me back to when the Umarex 850 Air Magnum first proved that CO2 rifles were capable of medium range hunting. My personal battle weary 850 was one of the early models, running on an 88 gram canister of CO2 it proved the demise of countless feral pigeons and rats.

This new model on test has moved the original concept on somewhat, and the new XTC Marauder on test comes bundled with virtually everything you need including a Walther 3 – 9 X 40 scope, Backdraft silencer and their MkII Tactical bipod. The only thing missing is a set of sling swivel attachment points.

Back to Back

Most apparent is the hardwood, sporter stock and what appears to be a brass-capped air reservoir. It is in fact the storage for the CO2 power supply and is removed to fi ll. It takes two Back to back Most apparent is the hardwood, sporter stock and what appears to be a brass-capped air reservoir. It is in fact the storage for the CO2 power supply and is removed to fill. It takes two

Unlike the old, 850 Synthetic AirMagnum the XTC feels different, and its brown, anti-shine lacquered stock feels like a normal air rifl e. This is perfectly acceptable as the 850’s forend was removable to take the larger 88 gram CO2 cylinder.

Once gassed-up it’s worth dry fi ring a few times to ensure the gas bulbs are fully pierced and the CO2 is feeding through the inlet valve and the rest of the rifl e’s internals are as they should be. Expect approximately 35-40 full power shots at around 11ft lb.

The fully ambidextrous stock is surprisingly compact with a well defi ned, medium height cheekpiece and a broad substantial neck with a fl ared pistol grip. The but has a thick, ventilated, rubber pad. The wood forend is a modifi ed beaver tail with a fi nger groove on each side.

Action & Performance

story continues below...

To remove the mag, open the action where it locks in position, now operate the magazine retainer, which is a long, slim, serrated catch found directly behind the magazine housing on the right of the action. Once slid back, lift the 8-shot rotary magazine from the left of the action. Incidentally as soon as the cocking bolt is pulled fully rearward you’ve also set the automatic safety which is sensibly sited at the rear of the action block – but more of that later.

To fill the magazine; insert pellets into the 8-chambers with the alloy centre boss facing you. Ensure they are fully seated before refi tting. Its worth noting that longer type pellets won’t suit this relatively slim magazine, so are best avoided. Replace the magazine back into the left of the action block and push the bolt forward and turn back down clockwise to its original position. This has now chambered the fi rst round and also takes the magazine retaining catch forward for this fi rst pass of the bolt, so everything is safe, solid and secure.

T-bar

The automatic, T-bar safety catch protrudes from the rear of the action block to indicate the rifl e is on safe. It’s ideally positioned for operating with the thumb of the shooting hand. To disengage push down the primary safety, a slim vertical slide catch within the main outer body of the safety then you can push in the safety catch to put the rifl e into fi re mode. This exposes a red dot on top of the action base plate indicating the rifle is ready to fire.

It can be manually reset by pulling back. Cycling the bolt reloads the gun, but bear in mind that this action automatically re-sets the safety. Though some might see this as overly slow, you are in no doubt that for every shot you need to make the conscious effort of fl ipping it off to fi re the rifl e, which is no bad thing! When the magazine is empty, simply pull back the cocking bolt, then slide back the retaining catch to remove the mag for reloading.

Double Ended Backdraft

One of the added accessories is the Backdraft Silencer – and it’s bit different! I say this as the design is double-ended so can go on the muzzle either way and offers two options. The build is hollow with no baffl es just an internal boss and sized chambers. Dependant on which way it sits you either have 1/3rd of a refl ex design protruding past the ½” UNF threaded muzzle or two thirds forward.

The can is made from a lightweight alloy and measures 9.6 x 1 ½”. So what’s this all about I hear you ask? Working on the Refl ex principle and using a void-like plenum chamber, you can set it to have more or less void forward of the muzzle. If it suits it can be made shorter, or longer with more sound reduction. It works by having sound dispersion holes drilled in to the internal boss, which allow the air to escape into the silencer void. However, how it manages to be so quiet is a mystery to me!

The build shows a plastic guard and trigger blade, but the mech offers a crisp and reasonable break and you soon get used to the 2-stage, adjustable unit’s basic charm. Having said that groups of ¾” c-c at a 25-yd zero aren’t to be sniffed at when using the bipod, and of course, operation is recoilless. In fact, with all these accessories included, Umarex/Hammerili seem to have thought of it all. GM

PRICES: Approximately £380 incl. 2X magazines, bipod, Walther scope and Backdraft silencer

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Armex XTC Marauder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

gun
features

  • Model: : Hammerli XTC Marauder 850 Air Magnum
  • Type : Bolt-action CO2 Powered
  • Capacity : 8 shot detachable magazine
  • Calibre : .22 on test .177 available
  • Stock : Hardwood Sporter
  • Sights : None fitted but action grooved for scope mounting
  • Barrel : 17.75” Lothar Walther

13 Comments

  • Hi Jon,

    How are you fitting the CO2 capsules?

    Default profile image
    Troll Hunter
    19 Jan 2015 at 06:10 PM
  • hi , i have purchased one of these second hand , and for the life of me , i cannot manage to get the gas out of it... can anyone tell me how to do it, or better still have any footage / youtube of it being done ? cheers

    Default profile image
    JON
    19 Jan 2015 at 11:10 AM
  • the trouble is T4 if you listen to the gun mags reviews,there's never been a rubbish rifle ever made.they don't want to upset the manufacturers that keep the industry afloat.tell the truth and shame the devil isn't a saying that they've ever come across.

    Default profile image
    badbullet
    30 Mar 2013 at 09:39 PM
  • Armex products are sold by many, many gunshops. Your best bet is to ring round your local shops to find out if they stock them but even if they don't. you could probably get them to order you one.

    Whereabouts are you?

    Default profile image
    Troll Hunter
    11 Dec 2012 at 11:38 PM
  • where can i buy that gun

    Default profile image
    Nathan wood
    11 Dec 2012 at 06:15 PM
  • I'm sure that the rifle has enough power to kill pigeons humanely, however, as a brain shot is the best way to kill them, your shooting must be up to scratch at the range at which you're shooting them. Spend a long time practicing before you attempt any shots at any live quarry.

    You obviously must have a valid reason to kill them and have the land owner's permission before you control any pests.

    Default profile image
    Troll Hunter
    09 Dec 2012 at 11:54 PM
  • can that gun take down pigeons

    Default profile image
    Nathan wood
    09 Dec 2012 at 10:24 PM
  • Thanks for your advice
    Regards

    T4

    Default profile image
    T4
    27 Sep 2012 at 09:36 AM
  • You are probably aware by now that the QB has a cult like following. The list of available tuning and custom parts is endless. Don't be tempted though to buy a .177. They are less efficient than .22 and the 'O' ring on the bolt is so tiny that it is inclined to get shredded. Fit the Robb kit and you'll have even sweeter handling piece of kit.

    Default profile image
    pete john
    25 Sep 2012 at 07:27 PM
  • Gentlemen

    Many thanks for your comments. Looks like I should have done more research and got the QB78.
    Pellets, only the thunderbolts, as they are zinc and lighter than lead I had expected more power output .

    Oh well, any one want tou buy an as new XTC !!

    Regards

    T4

    Default profile image
    T4
    25 Sep 2012 at 09:41 AM
  • Hi T4, sorry to hear you've not had any luck!

    What other pellets have you tried?

    Default profile image
    Troll Hunter
    25 Sep 2012 at 08:04 AM
  • I'll keep saying this till I'm blue in the face. Buy a QB78 in .22, strip it, clean out the swarf and fit a Terry Robb tuning kit. In total you will spend £250. Just be careful it doesn't creep over 12ft. lbs. You will have a gun that would knock that Armex into a cocked hat!

    Default profile image
    pete john
    24 Sep 2012 at 07:39 PM
  • just got the XTC synthetic based on this and similar review. Wow am I disappointed. Using the Thunderbolt much vaunted lead free pellets I could actualy see the pellets going down range !!! Impossible to zero, terrible power output, no good to me at all and useless for hunting.

    Default profile image
    T4
    23 Sep 2012 at 06:19 PM


Arrow