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Optisan Strike Rangefinder

Optisan Strike Rangefinder

Technology moves on and as the level of sophistication increases, conversely prices reduce. The Japanese, and latterly the Chinese, strive to drive down costs whilst maintaining an acceptable level of performance. The new Strike laser rangefinder (LRF) from MTC Optics is the latest example

Built as ever by Optisan, and whilst doubtless made in China, quality and ability is excellent given the low price tag. The Strike comes with a hard carry case, instructions, 2 X CR2 batteries, weighs 6 ½ oz and measures 5x4x2”, so nice and compact. It also features an automatic shutdown after 20-seconds.

6X Performance

In use, the Strike sits comfortably in the hand, with the tactile, rubberized surface assuring a good grip. A back-up wrist strap means there’s no real excuse for dropping it. Magnification is x6 with a 24mm objective.

Operation is simple; press the nearest button on the top edge to switch on the LCD display. A central line and target area then shows. Press a second time once the chosen object has been bracketed and the range is displayed, along with an indication of the quality of signal/working conditions. The second button is for mode setting, and includes selecting metres or yards.

A Need For Speed?

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As well as range-finding, the Strike offers speed measurement too. This is like a speed gun so only works when an object is going away or towards you, so is of little use to the shooter.

Range-finding performance was spot on. Close testing, i.e. airgun FT/HFT distances 8-55yds certainly came in within the prescribed +/- 1 yard deviation. The spec sheet says minimum distance is 10.9yds, which is pretty good.

One of the longer range objects included a large hay bale. This scanned at 320-322yds, and was later verified at 320yds! ! Even targets near the limit at 650 yds came in within 3-4 yds, which is good. Though it’s always about size, shape and reflectivity too, and holding the device steady enough to get a consistent hit and rebound for a true reading.

I did find that if the lighting was poor and the object vague when distant, then a reading may fail to register, but in reasonable conditions, with crisply defined targets, the device proved reliable.

Conclusion

Whether checking that targets are set at the correct range, or ranging game in the field, this device is an asset, and has to be seen as good value for money when compared to the competition.

For: Not so efficient with indistinct targets in dull conditions
Against: Do you need a strobe function?
Verdict: Puts a workable and accurate rangefinder within anyone’s grasp

PRICE: £134

  • Optisan Strike Rangefinder - image {image:count}

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  • Optisan Strike Rangefinder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Optisan Strike Rangefinder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Optisan Strike Rangefinder - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

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