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Geigerrig Hydration pack

Geigerrig Hydration pack

It doesn’t suck – it sprays

Pete Wadeson tests the Geigerrig 1200 Hydration Backpack in Multi-Cam

‘Hydro Packs’ are like standard backpacks or rucksacks as some people call them, but with the addition of a ‘bladder’ to carry water and a drinking tube giving hands-free access when on the move.

They are now in common use with many armed forces and emergency services (particularly in the USA) instead of - or as well as - a standard canteen. Shooters in the UK are now catching on to the benefits of hydro-pack systems for the active hunter.

The Pack

The Geigerrig 1200 (shown here in Multi-Cam) is just such a system. The backpack measures approximately 18 ½” high X 12” wide X 8” deep when typically laden and is manufactured from Heavy Duty Dura-Oxkin and weighs 1.22Kg including the 3 litre hydration pack (bladder) system that Geigerrig call an Hydration Engine.

Heavy duty size zippers are used on all pockets and have reflective tabs and zipper pulls. There’s even a soft internal pocket chamber with external zipper for an i-Pod or mobile phone, however for our purposes it’ll easily take many of the popular compact remote fox calls.

The ergonomic fit shoulder straps feature a terraced overlay for positioning the adjustable water delivery tube. It also has an integrated slider chest strap and removable waist strap which are both adjustable.

The pack features outer compression straps, PVC reinforced exterior side heavy mesh pockets, external bungee storage system, internal storage compartments and an organizer which will easily take care of your stowage needs. The rear of the pack that comes into contact with your back has Eco Rig Back Pads which cushion the pack adding more comfort and Air Drive Ventilation to help keep you cool. A heavy duty nylon pack handle is positioned on top for quick pick-ups when only moving a short distance.

The Hydration Engine

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Hydration packs in the field can be a huge asset, but have you noticed they virtually all have an annoying design flaw? Say you’ve hiked to a far off shooting position. You’re parched, so you reach for the tube of your hydration unit and for most, to get a drink from the bladder of a normal pack you’re like trying to suck water through a very long straw while at the same time still trying to catch your breath. Get the gist?

Geigerrig has eliminated the need to suck the water out by introducing their Hydration Engine, which is basically a pressurized reservoir, so the water is forced out, like a fountain, when you ‘bite’ or squeeze the valve. This not only makes it much easier to drink, but it allows you to share water in a more hygienic way.

The reservoir is pressurized via a hand pump. The pump bulb (like the one used in blood pressure tests) nests inside one of the shoulder straps. It fills a separate air chamber within the reservoir once in place, pressurizing the water chamber. This offers a steady flow of water and is sprayed into your mouth - you can also spray clean your hands and face. A secondary benefit is that the pressure stops the water sloshing around in the bladder.

There’s an in-line water filter that snaps into the hose. In-line filters haven’t been possible before because of the added resistance the filter causes. The pressurized reservoir pushes the water through the filter and out the valve. The company’s anti-microbial activated carbon filters will remove most nasty protozoa, making any water you come across a viable source of hydration. The in-line filter cleans water on the go and can purify approx.. 50 gallons.

The 3L bladder has quick-release valves for the drinking tube and the pressurization tube, and a slide top for easy refill, cleaning and drying.To fill with water you just pull the bladder out, unzip the top, fill it up, and then zip it closed. To use the filter, you have to switch to the hose with the filler attachment, so these are optional extras.

It’s best to fill the storage pockets of the 19-litre pack (excluding hydration engine) before pumping up the air bladder, since the expanded reservoir would make less room for packing your gear.

The Geigerrig 1200 Hydration Pack is available in a multitude of colours including hi-viz for those who need to be seen but the Multi-Cam version (as seen here)is in my opinion one of the top Hydration Backpacks currently available for the hunter. For those that prefer a smaller or lighter weight pack, there are 8, 9 or 11 litre packs available with 2 litre hydration bladders.

Recommended price of the Geigerrig 1200 Hydration Pack is £119.95 – contact Whitby and Co. on 01539 721032 or visit www.whitbyandco.co.uk for details and prices of other Geigerrig Hydration Packs and accessories.

Paracord wristbands are a popular bit of kit these days, being, as they are fashionable, attractive and a way of carrying some useful gear in a comfortable way.

The Web Tex paracord wristband comes in Black, Green, or Sand coloured paracord woven in a “cobra stitch” pattern in sizes 20cm or 23cm.  The 20cm version contains about 2.46m of multi-cored paracord, the 23cm version a little more, and both versions close with a black, quick-release snap buckle that incorporates a loud and noticeable whistle.

Do not expect to be able to re-tie the wristband to the same length - the cord ends are trimmed to size when the wrist band is completed, and you will not have enough length for rethreading the ends.  You can, however, re-weave the wristband to a smaller size.

So there you are – an emergency whistle and a useful supply of paracord for emergency use for around £5.50, in a form of an attractive fashion accessory that can be worn anywhere at any time.

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  • Geigerrig Hydration pack - image {image:count}

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  • Geigerrig Hydration pack - image {image:count}

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  • Geigerrig Hydration pack - image {image:count}

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