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Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model

Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model

The name of Boxall & Edmiston – the new and increasingly successful British gun company – will be familiar to many readers, as may my own involvement in the development of their over and under guns. When at the CLA some time back, I saw the very snazzy side by sides that B&E were making aided by the clever use of high technology. They did not dispense with traditional bench work where it was needed, but their engineering abilities were especially evident. They were also making use of a clever new laser technology for engraving purposes – a real game changer for modern gunmaking. One could not help but be favourably impressed with their outlook and their products.

A Few Suggestions

After prolonged discussions social and professional with the Boxall & Edmiston team, I suggested that they really needed to consider making an over and under. They responded by saying that it was part of their plan but had not been addressed yet. I suggested that, in my opinion, an over and under would be more generally popular than a side by side – even a very beautiful one – and that it should probably be a low profile design with Boss style bolting, bifurcated lumps (those to the side of the monobloc/breech rather than hanging underneath), and a fixed lock trigger mechanism using traditional rather than helical springs to power the works (to avoid the cracking stocks that are perennial problem of some drop lock OU’s). To make the first gun aesthetically pleasing, I suggested a rounded action bar would look good, although it might be made in other forms in the future.

Combined Effort

Well, there seemed to be a meeting of minds, and the gun came into being as the ‘Yardley Model’. Great efforts were expended by Peter Boxall (previously of Holland & Holland and Jaguar) in developing and perfecting the mechanical design (with some input from me). Manuel Ricardo and I working frantically on the stock towards an intended launch at last year’s cancelled CLA (and Peter also working in parallel with master British stocker Peter Roland). The test gun (the first product of these efforts), meanwhile, is a beautifully engraved, round body, with what I believe is an elegant and practical semi-pistol grip stock. I was incredibly pleased, and proud, when I first saw the gun. Aesthetically, it will stand in ANY company.

The bold, black-filled, scroll work looks great, as does the Boxall & Edmiston name cleverly positioned on a bolster on either side of the action bar. The shaping of the bar, and the action fences all rate an excellent. The overall effect as perfected by Peter was jaw droppingly beautiful.

How Does It Handle?

Well, I am delighted to say, as live firing tests would later confirm, that it felt very good. The gun felt solid – indeed, much like a London gun with plenty of weight between the hands without there being too much weight at either end. This is something that some makers – especially those restricted by mass production techniques – never get right. Many mass produced guns have heavy, thick-walled, barrels with muzzles tromboned to accommodate multichokes and chunky machined stocks with grips and combs which are larger than they need to be for ease of production.

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The hand stocking of the Boxall & Edmiston (and I should point out all production guns are 100% made in England) and the hand made, monobloc, barrels are huge bonuses. It means one benefits from the best of old and new worlds. Artisan stocking allows for the creation of an elegant, slim, but efficient shape with a fairly open radius pistol grip and a tapered comb likely to relieve the face in recoil. The quality of wood is good (and even better in production guns than the prototype shown in the pictures). Traditional barrel manufacture allows for the tubes to be made strong but not too heavy.

The monobloc barrels, bearing, of course, British proof marks for 2 3/4” (70mm) cartridges for this all British gun, are well presented. There is no rib on the top in the prototype but a solid, slightly tapered design is a no cost option (and would be my own preference). Joining ribs are solid too as befits a game gun. There is no bead at the muzzles of the prototype but a traditional metal one would normally be fitted. Looking at the barrels carefully, one notes good blacking, impeccable striking up and an absence of external rivelling or fl aw or internal blemish. Forcing cones are of medium length.

The action apart from being an aesthetic triumph, is mechanically a combination of all things good with trunnion hinging, bifurcated lumps as noted, and Boss bolting (including Boss style draws and wedges amid ships). V springs power the tumblers (and Boxall & Edmiston have great experience in making these in quantity for the British gun trade). There are twin cocking bars and a clever ejection system developed by Peter Boxall.

Production guns have an interesting extra feature, which came out of conversations with Peter. An internal cover plate is now machined into the bottom area of the action body so these are not open to the ingress of debris as in most over and under guns. The single trigger is of inertia type (though a mechanical trigger is also in development) and there is a button type sliding tang safety which is combined with a Browning style barrel selector on the top tang. Even here one notes the detailing with elegant form of the safety button. In a quality gun, detail is everything.

Shooting Impressions

I shot the B&E at the Oxford Gun Company with my youngest son Harry, a keen member of the Oxford Brookes Shooting Society and ever more proficient shot. I am always grateful for the hospitality of the Florent family meantime (and while I am at it let me plug David Florent’s efforts to bring young people into shooting with the admirable Schools Challenge events).

The gun that bears my name shot really well and inspired confidence. The handling dynamics were good as noted, recoil control and pointability were both good. I am delighted to say that I connected with most everything I pointed it at. Harry noted how solid and shootable it felt with barrels that were not too heavy. Recently I shot a production side-plated B&E too, and it was, I have to say, if anything even better - 100% dust on all clays it was pointed at - nothing got away.

Overall verdict - a fantastic new British gun. Then I am biased… and happy to admit it. To judge for yourself, why not get in touch with Boxall & Edmiston and try one out?

My thanks to Lyalvale Express for supplying the HV cartridges used in this test. GM

  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

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  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

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  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

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  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

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  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

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  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

  • Boxall & Edmiston Yardley Model - image {image:count}

    click on image to enlarge

gun
features

  • Model: Boxall & Edmiston 'Yardley Model'
  • Bore: 12 bore with 20 in development and anticipated for launch this year
  • Barrels:: 30” (28-32” options)
  • Chamber:: 2 3/4” (70mm)
  • Rib:: Test gun is ribless, but a solid taper design is a no cost option
  • Weight:: Just over 7 lbs 3oz. approx.

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